International Journal of Humanities and Social Science

ISSN 2220-8488 (Print), 2221-0989 (Online) 10.30845/ijhss

EMPOWERMENT FROM THE MARGINS: AN IMPLICATION FOR MARGINALIZED STUDENTS FOUND IN AN EXPLORATION OF SOUTH CAROLINA SLAVE NARRATIVE
Rénard Harris

Abstract
Between 1936 and 1938 narratives from former slaves were collected during the Works Progress Administration’s Federal Writer’s Project. Over 200 of those narratives were collected in South Carolina. In the 1800’s the Georgetown district thrived as the principal rice-growing area in the United States. Over forty-six million pounds of rice were produced in Georgetown County. An interpretive analysis of narratives from twelve former slaves were collected in Georgetown County and neighboring areas. The former slaves self-affirmation as a knowledgeable people and their pride and connection to the land they worked were emerging themes. The researcher believes that these themes demonstrate empowerment from a marginalized people, and provide major implication for today’s marginalized students. Today’s marginalized students are self-affirming and making connections to what they believe is important. As educators, we must facilitate and provide opportunities for those affirmations and connections to be nurtured to support marginalized students becoming contributing citizens.

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