International Journal of Humanities and Social Science

ISSN 2220-8488 (Print), 2221-0989 (Online) 10.30845/ijhss

SAFEGUARDING THE STRAITS OF MALACCA AGAINST MARITIME CRIME. ISSUES AMONGST STATES ON SECURITY RESPONSIBILITY
Inderjit Singh a/l Tara Singh

Abstract
The use of the Straits of Malacca generally revolves around three sets of interests: warfare and the projection of military power across the globe, commercial interests and maritime trade, and economic exploitation of the sea. One of the biggest issues in the Straits of Malacca today is the threat to maritime security from piracy and terrorism. According to the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) the sovereignty over ‘territorial seas,’ which extend twelve nautical miles off a state’s coasts, the Malaccan Strait falls to the littoral states namely Indonesia, Malaysia, and Singapore. But other maritime states such as Japan and China are imposing authority in protecting this strait for economic reasons in shielding their ships against maritime crime. The act of terrorism from various groups and other separatist groups has complicated and brought more challenges to the security of this straits as US is insisting in joining the back wagon in providing naval security in the global war against terrorism. Nevertheless the littoral states are adamant in ensuring their responsibility in providing security with extensive military exercises amongst these states ensuring non interference from other maritime and non state actors. Malaysia and Indonesia feels there is no need for the presence of an extra regional force for the purpose of securing the straits and that such presence will impinge on the sovereignty of the country unlike Singapore who is the most vocal advocate of international cooperation.

Full Text: PDF